The Domestic tiki CBD gives back (PPE) Mask Donation Effort

The Domestic Tiki CBD, covid 19 PPE, protective mask donation effort. Some of the medical professionals we have protected.

The Domestic Tiki CBD cares about your health and wellness!

As seen on KCRA NBC Channel 3 News!


The Domestic Tiki CBD is making and donating PPE, Personal Protective Equipment, protective masks. We are donating these vital face-masks to Medical Professionals, First Responders' and the community at large. This is our way of assisting the people we love, that's YOU, get through this covid-19, coronavirus pandemic. We have personally witnessed a friend go through this illness and it's heartbreaking to watch, we do not want anyone to lose a loved one. Please, heed the warnings and exercise social distancing, limit your trips outside and only for essentials. 

Be safe, healthy and well!


Much love and mahao,


TiKi DoN and Ally


To Make A Donation:   https://www.paypal.me/comunity360  

Add us on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TheDomesticTiki/ 

Follow us on Instagram: @domestictiki

Covid -19 Mask Effort

Please allow 24 hours to process

cloth face covering information from the cdc

image58

USE OF CLOTH FACE COVERINGS TO HELP SLOW THE SPREAD OF COVID-19

How to Wear a Cloth Face Covering


Cloth face coverings should—

  • fit snugly but comfortably against the side of the face
  • be secured with ties or ear loops
  • include multiple layers of fabric
  • allow for breathing without restriction
  • be able to be laundered and machine dried without damage or change to shape


CDC on Homemade Cloth Face Coverings


CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.


The CDC also advises the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.


Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.


The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance.


Frequently Asked Questions:


Should cloth face coverings be washed or otherwise cleaned regularly? How regularly?


Yes. They should be routinely washed depending on the frequency of use.


How does one safely sterilize/clean a cloth face covering?


A washing machine should suffice in properly washing a face covering.


How does one safely remove a used cloth face covering?


Individuals should be careful not to touch their eyes, nose, and mouth when removing their face covering and wash hands immediately after removing.

Some Tips To Keep You Safe From The CDC...

image59

Centers For Disease Control And Prevention

  • How to Protect Yourself

Older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness. More information on Are you at higher risk for serious illness?


  • Know How it Spreads

There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus.

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).

Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.


  • Take steps to protect yourself

Clean your hands often

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds especially after you have been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Avoid close contact

Avoid close contact with people who are sick

Put distance between yourself and other people if COVID-19 is spreading in your community. This is especially important for people who are at higher risk of getting very sick.


  • Take steps to protect others

Stay home if you are sick, except to get medical care. 

Cover coughs and sneezes

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze or use the inside of your elbow.

Throw used tissues in the trash.

Immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.

Wear a facemask if you are sick

If you are sick: You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g., sharing a room or vehicle) and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example, because it causes trouble breathing), then you should do your best to cover your coughs and sneezes, and people who are caring for you should wear a facemask if they enter your room. Learn what to do if you are sick.

If you are NOT sick: You do not need to wear a facemask unless you are caring for someone who is sick (and they are not able to wear a facemask). Facemasks may be in short supply and they should be saved for caregivers.


  • Clean and disinfect

Clean AND disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. This includes tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

If surfaces are dirty, clean them: Use detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.

To disinfect:

Most common EPA-registered household disinfectants will work. Use disinfectants appropriate for the surface.

Options include:

Diluting your household bleach.

To make a bleach solution, mix:

5 tablespoons (1/3rd cup) bleach per gallon of water

OR

4 teaspoons bleach per quart of water

Follow manufacturer’s instructions for application and proper ventilation. Check to ensure the product is not past its expiration date. Never mix household bleach with ammonia or any other cleanser. Unexpired household bleach will be effective against coronaviruses when properly diluted.

Alcohol solutions.

Ensure solution has at least 70% alcohol.

Other common EPA-registered household disinfectants.

Products with EPA-approved emerging viral pathogens pdf icon[7 pages]external icon claims are expected to be effective against COVID-19 based on data for harder to kill viruses. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for all cleaning and disinfection products (e.g., concentration, application method and contact time, etc.).


Source:  https://www.cdc.gov/ 


 

To Make A Donation: https://www.paypal.me/comunity360 

Add us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TheDomesticTiki/ 

Follow us on Instagram: @domestictiki

Partners helping to SERVE OUR communities

Lee Jason Friend, founder of masks of hope.

Masks Of Hope, Palm Springs California

Our good friend and fellow Ohana Lee Jason, heads Masks of Hope and they are currently working hard to fill their need locally in Southern California. With over 1100 masks donated to date they have made a big impact in their community. 


If you are in need, would like to help volunteer, donate in Southern CA or the Palm Springs CA area please reach out to Lee, he would be glad to help.


www.masksofhope.com